Living with Anxiety

Hello.

I’ve wanted to blog about my anxiety disorder for such a long time, and today I’m finally ready to sit down and talk about it. I’ve spoken to the Journal about my mental health and shared my story over on SpunOut, but I felt like it was time to write about it here on Scribbles By Kat.

I’ve been battling with anxiety for over two years now. There have been many difficult moments during this ongoing battle, from extreme panic attacks to isolating myself from friends and family and from difficult GP visits to emotional counselling sessions. It hasn’t been easy, but as time goes by I’ve learned how to live with my anxiety.

Back in 2015 my anxiety was extremely bad. There were days when I couldn’t leave the house or get on bus or speak to anyone or visit the city centre. I was crippled with an intense fear and waves of worry flooded my mind. There were days when I cancelled plans with my dearest friends, because I was too anxious to get out of my bed. There were days when I stood at my bus stop and let dozens of buses pass me by, because I was too anxious to move and go into the city. There were nights where I had to leave bars because I just couldn’t deal with the crowds. There have been days when I’d leave to go to college and then turn back home, because I couldn’t handle the bus journey or being with my classmates or delivering a presentation. There have been sleepless nights and panic attacks and constant tears.

Anxiety isn’t cute or trendy. It’s not about being shy or bashful. I can’t just ‘get over it’ or ‘be more confident’. It’s not about being too sensitive or too nervous. It’s a serious mental illness that many people fail to treat with respect or care.

I am learning to live with my anxiety disorder. I still have my bad days, but this year there have been more good days than bad. I still have panic attacks, I still suffer from sleep paralysis triggered by my anxiety, I still struggle to go into the city centre, I still find it hard to breathe, I still get intense heart palpitations. I still have days when my mind is full of worry and dread and unbearable negative thoughts.

There are so many people that dismiss anxiety. There are so many people who don’t take it seriously. There are so many people who believe it doesn’t matter. There are so many people who don’t treat it like a real illness.

“You’re just a bit shy.”

“You need to go out in the fresh air more.”

“There’s nothing wrong with you, you’re just being silly.”

“Stop looking for attention.”

“You’re just over-reacting.”

However, there are people who are making a difference by opening up and talking about mental health. When writing about depression in Reasons To Stay Alive, Matt Haig says “Depression is also smaller than you. Always, it is smaller than you, even when it feels vast. It operates within you, you do not operate within it. It may be a dark cloud passing across the sky, but- if that is the metaphor- you are the sky.

You were there before it. And the cloud can’t exist without the sky, but the sky can exist without the cloud.”

I remind myself of his words every single day. My anxiety isn’t in control of my life. My anxiety isn’t bigger than me. My anxiety isn’t more powerful. My anxiety isn’t going to win.

People will dismiss anxiety. People will mock you and belittle you and disrespect you when you speak about anxiety. People will tell you to ‘get over yourself’ or to ‘shake it off’. People will tell you that you’re being over the top or attention seeking, but you’re not.

This is my anxiety story and I will continue to fight against my disorder, and I will continue to talk about it, no matter how many people knock me down. Living with anxiety is an ongoing battle. It is a real disorder that needs to be taken seriously. We may live in a country where many people dismiss mental health, however, together we can change things by talking about anxiety in an open and honest way.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

-Margaret Mead

Sincerely Yours,

Kat

 

Home Sweet Home

Thousands of people will be flying home to Ireland from all across the globe this Christmas. They’ll be greeted by their loved ones at the airport with open arms and handmade banners. They’ll be driven home to a warm and cosy house where they’ll sit in the living room with a cup of tea and 101 stories to tell their family about their time away from the Emerald  Isle. 

Christmas is a time where we cherish our family and appreciate our home that’s been decked out in festive decorations. Unfortunately there are thousands of people spending Christmas on the streets this year. According to The Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government Homelessness Report in October 2016 there are 4377 people who are ‘officially homeless’ in Ireland.

Knowing that someone will be spending Christmas on the cold, empty streets of Dublin instead of being surrounded by family is devastating. But what can we do to help?

You can get involved with the Home Sweet Home campaign, who are working tirelessly to end homelessness in Ireland. It’s time to make the change we want to see. It’s up to us, the people of Ireland, to help as much as we can to defeat homelessness. To donate to this incredible campaign please go to https://www.gofundme.com/home-sweet-home-ireland where every cent you donate will help stop homelessness. 

This Christmas you can also make a donation to Focus Ireland and help stop another family becoming homeless in our country. All you have to do is click on this link which will bring you to Focus Ireland’s donation page https://www.focusireland.ie/donate/ where you can donate whatever you can.

The homeless crisis in Ireland is worsening and it’s up to us to stop it. We can’t let anymore families lose their homes or let people sleep rough on the streets as the rain pours down and soaks the cardboard they have to sleep on. Be grateful that you have a roof over your head this Christmas because there are thousands of people across the country that don’t.

Keep the homeless people in your thoughts this Christmas and make a donation. Hopefully this time next year they’ll be sitting in a warm, cosy home instead of in a sleeping bag on the street. 

Sincerely Yours,

Kat.